Americans Rank Real Estate #1 Long Term Investment

Americans Rank Real Estate #1 Long Term Investment | Simplifying The Market

Americans Rank Real Estate #1 Long Term Investment

 Wednesday May 4th, 2016  First Time Home BuyersFor BuyersMove-Up Buyers

The Gallup organization recently released a survey in which Americans were asked to rank what they considered to be the “best long term investment.” Real estate ranked number one, with 35% of those surveyed saying it was a better long term investment than stocks & mutual funds, gold, savings accounts or bonds.

Here is the breakdown:

Americans Rank Real Estate #1 Long Term Investment | Simplifying The Market

The survey revealed that real estate was the number one choice among each of the following groups:

  • Men
  • Women
  • People between the ages of 18-29
  • People between the ages of 30-49
  • People between the ages of 50-64
  • People 65 and older
  • People with annual earnings of less than $30,000
  • People with annual earnings between $30,000 and $74,999
  • People with annual earnings of over $75,000
  • People with a college degree
  • People without a college degree

Even stock investors ranked real estate number one. According to the report:

“With housing prices showing a steadier path upward in recent months, even stock investors are about as likely…to choose real estate (37%) as stocks (32%) as the best long-term investment.”

This Friday, I will be posting an infographic showing additional findings revealed in the report.

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Uncovering the Metrics Behind an Award-Winning Email

Uncovering the Metrics Behind an Award-Winning Email

BY LAUREN SMITH

Every interaction with your subscribers counts. Send emails that your subscribers want, that are relevant to their needs and interests, that excite them, and (most importantly!) that make them want to take action.

Campaigns that accomplish all the above not only win the hearts and minds of your customers, they’re a win for your business. And we’re particularly proud of one campaign in particular that also won an award: the 2016 EEC Email Marketing Program Award for “Best or Most Innovative Integration with Another Channel.”

That campaign was our save the date email for TEDC15 (The Email Design Conference).

What surprised us? This campaign wasn’t a success because it had the most opens or clicks. In fact, it had much lower open and click rates compared to our other emails.

However, opens and clicks wasn’t our goal. The main call-to-action in the campaign asked our readers to tweet—and, boy, did we get a lot of tweets! It excelled at its stated goals of driving awareness and creating buzz around the conference, and we’re humbled and grateful to have won an award in recognition of those efforts!

A LOOK AT THE CAMPAIGN

THE GOALS

After embedding a video background into TEDC14’s “save the date,” we had set high expectations with the community for a follow-up in 2015. As such, the primary goal of the campaign was to surprise, delight, and inspire our audience with a creative use of email, preferably leveraging a technique that is rarely seen or thought to be unsupported in email.

By utilizing innovative techniques in event-related emails, we wanted to demonstrate thought leadership and prove to our subscribers that we have the expertise and skills to teach others at TEDC. Additional goals were to raise awareness and excitement about the event, drive social mentions, and create anticipation for future ticket sales.

THE EMAIL

After many brainstorming sessions, we opted to announce dates and generate excitement for TEDC15 by embedding an innovative live Twitter feed inside an email.

tedc15-email

You can view the full email in your browser, or check out the Litmus test results to see how it displayed in 40+ email clients.

“Save the date” emails were sent to Litmus subscribers and past attendees. Each contained a live dynamic Twitter feed featuring tweets using the #TEDC15 hashtag. As recipients opened the email, live tweets appeared within the email. Subscribers tweeted using the hashtag, then returned to the email to see their own message appear live in the stream inside the email.

MEASURING SUCCESS: WHAT METRICS MATTER?

The campaign garnered widespread attention, resulting in 5,000 new visitors to the Litmus website, 1,000 new prospects, and 750 tweets containing the event hashtag—all within 24 hours.

To date, it’s garnered nearly 1,260 forwards and 350 prints. More than 60% of the people that opened the email spent 18 or more seconds reading the message, the highest duration of engagement of any email we’ve ever sent.

When we launched ticket sales a few weeks later, early bird tickets sold out in 10 minutes for the Boston event and 48 hours for the London event.

Despite being sent nearly a year ago, the campaign continues to drive additional email and social engagement as users re-visit the email and contribute to the Twitter stream.

The goal of this campaign went beyond opens and clicks to draw the email community together and create awareness for the event. Between hundreds of tweets, dozens of forwards and prints, and early bird tickets selling in minutes, it exceeded every expectation.

WHAT’S YOUR MOST SUCCESSFUL CAMPAIGN?

Many marketers focus on open and click rates. While those metrics can be a great way to measure overall engagement, they don’t paint the whole picture of a campaign’s performance, especially when different emails have different goals.

What has been your most successful campaign? How did you measure its success?

Charles R Juarez Jr.
Contributor 

Great LinkedIn News

Great LinkedIn News
by Art Williams

Hot off the press, I just saw some LinkedIn (LI) news that should be very interesting to Markethive (MH) members: LI now has a new feature for their membership whereby members can search for various types of service providers within the LI community. It's called ProFinder and it sounds similar to a Fiver or Upwork service except that apparently LI doesn’t take a ‘cut’ of the fee.

What does it mean for MH community members?

It means that those of us who have marketable skills should be able to get actual work from the LI community. It also means that we’ll be able to build more awareness of the caliber of our community and what we can do with our unique tools.

I haven’t thoroughly thought it through yet but I also wonder if it might even give us an opportunity to flog (a ‘Brit’ word for sell) our BlogCasting and/or article writing service and skill over there?

I think it will…somehow.

Just in case you don’t know, it’s fairly easy to get connections on LI. I’m up to about 1100+ in my own network. Other members of our group, like John Lombaerde, have even much larger networks. Furthermore, most of the people on LI are mature enough about professional networking to expect to be contacted about ‘deals’ and JV’s, and proposals.

What I just read about ProFinder said that it ‘matches’ service providers (from the LI community) with other people on LI who might need that particular service…. Presumably in response to a ‘search’ which the member performed.

I have no idea, yet, about how that process works but what I’m wondering is, ‘how much proactive solicitation might we be able to do?’

Maybe the answer is, ‘none’. Maybe any work we might get from this program would simply come as an inquiry from somebody who searched the new program, via keywords, for a service they need.

But one thing is for sure: those people are usually very busy and they probably don’t mind paying for good work. So, I’m thinking that we just have to figure out the solicitation protocols (to the extent there are any).

This new LI feature also brings up something John Lombaerde has been emphasizing too: the importance of a good profile, i.e. with the proper keywords. Apparently, when a LI community member is looking for our service(s) keywords figure into the search.

Here at MH, ‘we’ know we’re a cut about average, but now getting access to the serious business professionals over on LI should be good for us and it will be interesting to see what comes out of Tom’s mind after he’s had a chance to ponder this new development for a while.

LinkedIn is actively courting users to sign up for the program and even provides tips on how to get noticed inside ProFinder. I agree that it’s a smart move for LI too.

ProFinder is also a validation that ‘professional networking’ is here to stay and a force to be reckoned with as a legitimate way to do business in today’s digital world. And….as LI community members begin to realize all that MH has to offer, they’ll realize that nobody touches us in terms of innovation and value.

Art Williams
Case Study Writer and Markethive Contributor

 

What Does Advertising-Supported Revenue Model Mean?


What Does The Future of  the Ad-Supported
Revenue Model Mean to the Internet and Technology?

An advertising-supported revenue model is a business approach that emphasizes the sale of advertising as a major source of revenue. This structure is most prominent in traditional broadcast and print media, as well as online media. Media businesses generally earn revenue from advertising, customer subscriptions or a combination of the two.

Traditional Media

TV and radio shows, along with newspapers and magazines, generally serve to entertain or inform viewers or readers. TV and radio have traditionally been largely advertising-supported. While networks and TV stations do often earn revenue through subscriptions to satellite or cable television, much of their income is earned from advertisers trying to appeal to viewers. Similarly, magazines and newspapers charge subscription or purchase fees, but advertisers pay to place ads within these print media.

E-Commerce

The emergence of the Internet in the mid-1990s has affected the advertising-supported revenue model. Newspapers, for instance, have tried to adjust to increased demand for online content and limited growth in print publications. Thousands of media websites have been born online, which often offer free access to content for users. This attracts users and enables the publishes to sell banner ads and advertorial ad spaces. Traditional newspapers have offered free content as well, but many are trying to figure out how to combine ad revenue with subscription fees as of 2013.

Benefits

The benefit of an advertising-supported revenue model is that if you have an audience, you can almost always find companies that want to pay to reach it. This is especially true when you can provide specific details about the nature of your audience. When you operate with a 100 percent ad-supported model, you can more easily attract users with free content. Newspapers have long given away hundreds of copies to businesses and organizations in communities to drive up their circulation and readership, and subsequently, ad revenue potential.

Drawbacks

The major drawback of an entirely ad-supported revenue model is the inherent lack of diversification. Businesses generally prefer multiple revenue streams when possible. In a down economy, advertisers might back off their investments, which can more negatively affect a medium that has no subscription revenue. Plus, print publications, and even some websites, have high costs. Even a small subscription rate can help cover some of these costs. Local newspapers charging, say, 35 cents per issue can't use that to cover all production costs, but the fees do help offset costs and allow revenue to build.

Facebook Reports Soaring Revenue, Buoyed by Mobile Ads

On Wednesday, Mr. Zuckerberg’s social-networking company, Facebook, reported another quarter of soaring revenue. The company said sales in the fourth quarter rose 52 percent from a year ago, to $5.84 billion, while profit increased to $1.56 billion, more than doubling from $701 million a year ago. For the full year, the company reported $3.69 billion in profit on $17.93 billion in revenue, an increase of 44 percent from 2014.

The numbers far surpassed Wall Street’s fourth-quarter expectations of $1.2 billion in profit on $5.37 billion in revenue. Investors welcomed the performance by pushing up Facebook’s stock more than 12 percent in after-hours trading.

The results were largely a result of Facebook’s enormous success in selling advertising on mobile devices, a business that the company was not even in just a few years ago. Mobile ads made up 80 percent of the company’s total ad business in the fourth quarter, compared with 23 percent in the same quarter of 2012.

“We have a Super Bowl on mobile in the U.S. every single day,” Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook, said in an interview.

The results offer a bright spot in a tumultuous climate for many American technology stocks. Shares of Twitter, Facebook’s most visible social networking competitor in the United States, have tumbled more than 55 percent during the last year. Yelp, the local-review service, is down about 60 percent. LinkedIn, the professional social networking service, is off more than 15 percent.

Facebook is a much larger company than many of its peers, yet it is able to keep its growth rate high. The company has notched double-digit jumps in ad revenue and in the expansion of its user base. Facebook now has 1.59 billion monthly visitors, up 14 percent from a year ago. About 1.44 billion of those people visit the site on a mobile device; 1.04 billion visit Facebook every day.

That growth engine has given Facebook lots of room to play in different areas — like virtual reality, messaging and even building drones capable of delivering Internet service to far-flung places around the world — that seem to have little to do with Facebook’s core business of advertising.

Facebook is spending billions of dollars developing those projects, and Mr. Zuckerberg has repeatedly said the company has no plans to make money on them in the near term. In an earnings call with investors, David Wehner, Facebook’s chief financial officer, said the company projected that expenses would increase roughly 30 to 40 percent over the course of 2016 compared with last year.

One example of the spending is on Oculus, Facebook’s $2 billion bet on bringing virtual reality to the mainstream. The unit will begin selling its first headsets to consumers in March. Facebook has said it plans to sell the hardware, called the Rift, at a loss to help the technology catch on with a large audience.

“These are long-term bets, but we don’t think they’re particularly large bets relative to the size of Facebook,” said Ben Schachter, an Internet analyst at Macquarie Securities. “They’ve gone out of their way to say they’re not Google and going after health care, for instance.”

Other analysts said they also saw potential for profit in the hundreds of millions of people who regularly use Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp, a messaging service also owned by Facebook.

They are also bullish on the potential for Instagram, the photo-sharing service that has more than 400 million regular monthly users, to become a significant source of revenue in the future. The company does not disclose what portion of revenue Instagram accounts for in Facebook’s overall sales. Ms. Sandberg said 98 of the top 100 advertisers on Facebook also advertised on Instagram in the last quarter.

As for Mr. Zuckerberg, he spent a portion of the investor call on Wednesday talking about his new role as a father to his daughter, Max.

“With a new addition to my family, I’ve been reflecting a lot on the legacy we want to pass on to the next generation,” he said, adding that he wanted Facebook to “continue to focus on solving the fundamental challenges facing the world, and bringing the world closer together.”

Housing Inventory Disappearing

Housing Inventory Disappearing | Simplifying The Market

Housing Inventory Disappearing

 Tuesday May 3rd, 2016  For SellersHousing Market Updates

The price of any item is determined by the supply of that item, and the market demand. TheNational Association of Realtors (NAR) recently released their latest Existing Home Sales Report which gives insight into today’s market conditions.

Inventory Levels & Demand

Sales of existing homes rose 5.1% month-over-month in March and are 1.5% higher than this time last year. Sales rose in all four major regions in March.

Total unsold housing inventory is 1.5% lower than March 2015 at a 4.5-month supply and remains well below the six months that is needed for a historically normal market.

Consumer confidence is at the highest level in over a decade. Pair that with interest rates still below 4%, programs available for down payments as low as 3%, and you have an attractive market for buyers.

Homes sold in March were on the market for an average of 47 days and 42% of properties sold in less than a month.

Prices Rising

March marked the 49th consecutive month of year-over-year price gains as the median price of existing homes sold rose to $210,700 (up 5.7% from 2015).

So What Does This Mean?

The chart below shows the impact that inventory levels have on home prices.

Housing Inventory Disappearing | Simplifying The Market

 

NAR’s Chief Economist, Lawrence Yun gave some insight into the correlation:

"Buyer demand remains sturdy in most areas this spring and the mid-priced market is doing quite well. However, sales are softer both at the very low and very high ends of the market because of supply limitations and affordability pressures."

Bottom Line

If you are debating putting your home on the market in 2016, now may be the time. The number of buyers ready and willing to make a purchase is at the highest level in years. Let's meet up so we can get the process started.

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Youngevity homebase business

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Sharing Dr. Joel Wallach's original message of nutritional health with these new social media tools is allowing so many people to help leverage their time in their busy day to day life schedule. Youngevity is now connecting to demographics they could have never reached in the past. Evolving technologies and their new "Social Selling Network" platform is bringing exciting new possibilities for Youngevity customers and distributors as well. Thanks to smartphones and tablets and the flexibility of this technology, Youngevity distributors can hold their very own international business in the palm of their hand to conduct all types of business. Youngevity customers and distributors are now provided an opportunity to achieve the leisure lifestyle and health of their dreams defined by mobility, freedom, and prosperity.

Learn more at http://im90forlife.org/

 
Bruce Jacobs
Independant Rep. #E100397
 

Billionaire: Buy a Home… And if You Can, Buy a Second Home!

Billionaire: Buy a Home… And if You Can, Buy a Second Home! | Simplifying The Market

Billionaire: Buy a Home… And if You Can, Buy a Second Home!

 Monday May 2nd, 2016  First Time Home BuyersFor BuyersHousing Market UpdatesMove-Up Buyers

Three years ago, John Paulson gave a keynote address at the CNBC/Institutional Investor Conference. In his speech, he told those in attendance that he believes housing will continue its strong recovery for the next 4 to 7 years, saying that:

 

"The housing market has bottomed. It's not too late to get involved. I still think buying a home is the best investment any individual can make. Affordability is still at an all-time high."

When asked how the average person could take advantage of the current real estate market at the time, Paulson said:

“Buy a home and, if you can, buy a second home.”

Two years ago, Paulson reiterated his statement, saying:

"I still think, from an individual perspective, the best deal investment you can make is to buy a primary residence that you're the owner-occupier of."

Who is John Paulson and why should you listen to him?

Paulson is the person who, back in 2005 & 2006, made a fortune betting that the subprime mortgage mess would cause the real estate market to collapse. He understands how the housing market works and knows when to buy and when to sell.

What do others think of Paulson?

According to Forbes, John Paulson is:

“A multibillionaire hedge fund operator and the investment genius.”

According to the Wall Street Journal, Paulson is:

“A hedge fund tycoon who made his name, and a fortune, betting against subprime mortgages when no one else even knew what they were.” 

So… Is what he said still true?

The core reasons behind Paulson’s statements still ring true today, but why does he believe homeownership is such a great investment?

Paulson broke down the math of homeownership as an investment:

1. "Today financing costs are extraordinarily low.”

The latest numbers from Freddie Mac show us that you can still get a 30-year mortgage at historically low rates of under 4%.

2. “And if you put down, let's say, 10 percent and the house is up 5 percent,” as many experts predict,“then you would be up 50 percent on your investment."

How many are seeing a 50% return on a cash investment right now?

Paulson goes on to compare the long term financial benefits of owning versus renting:

3. “And you’ve locked in the cost over the next 30 years. And today the cost of owning is somewhat less than the cost of renting. And if you rent, the rent goes up every year. But if you buy a 30-year mortgage, the cost is fixed.”

Bottom Line

Whenever a billionaire gives investment advice, people usually clamor to hear it. This billionaire gave simple advice – if you don’t yet live in your own home, go buy one.

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Criticism and Its Roll In Success

Criticism and Its Role In Success

In this politically correct and often over-sensitive world we live in, criticism sometimes has such a negative connotation that most people automatically react poorly to even just the term itself without considering that criticism can have its benefits too.

It's also unfortunate that some people enjoy being critical and use their opportunity to dispense "constructive criticism" as an opportunity to bash others. Indeed there is a delicate dividing line between constructive and destructive criticism. 

But what happened to turn such a positive form of communication into a hated and feared concept?    

Sometimes it's our upbringing has tainted our idea of criticism. In your case, could it be that somebody in the past took this term and used it to justify their judgments on your life's choices?  Perhaps you were told one too many times that they were just giving you "constructive criticism" and that you shouldn't take it so personally. Or…perhaps in school you weren't the strongest in a particular subject and the teacher made fun of you and called it criticism.  

Regardless of the reason for any criticism you have experienced, you might have an unreasonable sensitivity to it and you can probably gain a lot in life by looking at it as one of the best forms of helping you, and others, succeed.  That's because honest, constructive criticism is meant to come from experts in the field. It's meant to be positive despite what it has become over the years.  

Although for many, criticism sometimes feels like a personal attack, maybe there can be a way for us to utilize it as a learning experience not only for ourself but for the critic too.   

For the person being critiqued, it is a way to grow in their field and criticism should be interpreted strictly as additional, updated, data.

There is so much to learn from someone who is experienced in your profession.  Everyone has experiences to share so why should you waste time and reinvent the wheel? Why not benefit from another person's life and/or business experience? If you're a writer, you will become a better writer through criticism.  If you're an artist, you will become a better artist through criticism. Or you might even be a pilot. Obviously there is a benefit of criticism there.

The point is that other people can often open your eyes to another perspective and your work will evolve into the best work you've ever done.

And don't forget that criticism benefits the critic just as much as the person being criticized.  The critic, if they take their responsibility or opportunity seriously, is learning too. They are learning the perspective of the person they're talking to…i.e. the writer, artist, pilot, or employee. Often they benefit from their responsibility to give an honest critique. They're learning too!

A true critic should be able to first put themselves in the shoes of the person they are critiquing.  Next, they should look at the work being discussed or evaluated from the public's view.  Then they should look at the work from their own view, from their own experience in that field.  

Think about it.  If you are getting advice from someone who just looked at your work from three different angles, that's three different angles than your own.  Think about how much you could learn. There's bound to be some valuable new 'data' there. And also consider that every field — artistic, professional, managerial, functional, or whatever — it's always changing.

It's easy to get into a rut but a little constructive criticism can help you get out of it. In fact, criticism can help you in your own 'quality control'. You really can be the beneficiary. The possibilities are endless!

Why Work Inbound Marketing?

Why Work Inbound Marketing?

Different teams are going to have different solutions for who does what when it comes to inbound marketing. At a smaller company, inbound marketing strategy may fall entirely to one person to create and execute. A larger team may have more specialized positions in content, social, brand, etc. or really any combination of the above tasks among any number of people, depending on the company’s needs an the team’s strengths.

So where does SEO fit in to all of this? Is search engine optimization as we know it being absorbed into other marketers’ jobs?

Rather than being threatened by other disciplines’ encroaching on our territory, or overwhelmed by the volume of tasks that go into a robust inbound marketing strategy, modern SEOs should be embracing the rise of inbound as a holistic approach since it allows us to do better marketing. The days of being handed a blog post and told to add keywords to it are coming to an end, and that’s a good thing!

What happens when a company has a lot of employees with SEO knowledge, but no SEO? I learned what that looked like when I started at SEOmoz. Obviously, lots of folks at SEOmoz understand SEO strategy and why it’s important, but it had been several months since an official SEO had worked at the company.

The result? A lot of elements that were important to SEO had fallen through the cracks or been back-burnered. Content producers knew that keywords were important, but didn’t know which ones to be using and where. New features had been added to the website in ways that were great for users, but created unnecessary headaches for search engines. Even though a lot of people on the marketing team understood the basic tenets of SEO, it was nobody’s job to make sure SEO was taken into account; they all had their own jobs to do. It’s one thing to know that SEO is important – it’s another to know what to pay attention to and look for, especially if your core competency is in another field.

The SEO as Inbound Marketer

Even at a company whose internal education around SEO is top-notch, it’s still vital to have someone to be a steward of the site’s online presence and search performance. SEOs need to take a “the buck stops here” attitude toward ensuring
that our designers, content creators, social media managers, PR representatives and the like are working together on a search-engine-friendly strategy that encompasses all of their efforts.

 

An SEO should be continually helping a larger inbound marketing team do better marketing in the following ways:

  • Analyzing keyword data and trends, and tracking traffic and links per content piece, to help the content manager create compelling, keyword-rich, linkworthy content.
  • Working with the dev team to keep the site fast, crawlable, error-free and trackable.
  • Building relationships with influencers in the space, and leveraging those relationships for links and shares.
  • Syncing with the Director of Marketing and PR contacts to enact a solid, consistent brand strategy, then making sure it’s seeded to the right places for maximum authority and impact.
  • Diving into analytics to support conversion rates; sharing analytics data with business development and account management teams to aid retention of search-driven customers.
  • Collaborating with the UX and design teams to make sure a site that’s a lovely experience for users is also a useful experience for search engines.
  • Consistently evangelizing SEO internally through ongoing education, and being a staunch advocate for SEO best practices in every meeting – the buck stops with you.

By starting to view SEO as a series of collaborations with more specialized colleagues, we can build inbound marketing programs as a team effort.

From Keywords to Sessions

One thing I’ve heard Duane Forrester from Bing speak on several times recently is the search session: the idea that people aren’t using search engines to make one-and-done searches, but rather to make a series of searches over a period of time that could be anywhere from several minutes to several days, before arriving at a decision that might result in a conversion. An example might be a user who starts with “honeymoon destinations” and searches for “beach honeymoon,” “romantic beaches Hawaii” and “Maui vacation packages” before finally searching on “cheap flights to Maui.” That keyword might be the one that gets the conversion, but each search is an opportunity to build brand relationships and influence the final purchase.

Even when consumers aren’t actively searching for things, they’re still building opinions about and relationships with brands via social media – not only through the conversations they’re having, but also through the content they consume. People spend a ton of time on the internet, and most of it isn’t on Google.

A robust, marketing-team-wide inbound marketing strategy is perfectly positioned to market to this new breed of searchers. In order to really start some next-level, better-than-ever organic search marketing, SEOs need to be cognizant of the fact that organic search is just part of a larger experience. To ignore inbound marketing in favor of tunnel-vision focus on SEO means fewer opportunities to engage with customers (not to mention fewer opportunities for links, shares, and other awesome SEO benefits).

We’re all in this together. Let’s get out there and make inbound marketing better.

Chuck Reynolds
Contributor

10 Core Characteristics of Great Entrepreneurs

 

https://Markethive.com/dennisroeder

Observing and working with entrepreneurs over the years it is clear that people in this category have many characteristics in common. And, while we all love to analyze the theories and strategies that can be learned from others to make things work better in your business as an entrepreneur, we often forget that there are also character traits that we could look to develop as well. You can read all the books in the world, but theories are useless unless you learn to adopt some of these characteristics:

1. Consistent boldness

Most entrepreneurs are naturally a little ballsy, but it’s not enough just to come up with a great idea or to start a business — you have to be consistently bold enough to stand by your idea, to keep pushing forward even when it seems like you’re making a monumental waste of effort, and when everyone around you just doesn’t see a happy ending. You also need to be bold enough to realize when you are stuck on a dead end road and it’s time to do something different.

You also have to be bold in putting yourself out there. Many people avoid doing this because they don’t want to feel sleazy or like they’re hard selling people, but unless you can get over this, nobody’s going to know about you or care about you.

Finally, you have to be bold in asking for what you want. Of course it’s totally terrifying to ask someone for something that you really want, but you will be amazed by how often people actually do help if you tell them how and if you ask the right way. For instance, I needed to raise money to build a vision called Markethive, an online ecosystem of sorts for Entrepreneurs. So I gathered up a couple hundred of my closet friends and associates, showed them my presentation and I raised $400,000 in 2 weeks to build the dream.  But because I was bold enough to put myself out there and because I asked in a way in a way that appealed to them, I was able to raise the money to make it work. A good sense of humor always helps too!

2. Passion

Passion is about feeling so deeply for something (or someone), nothing or no-one could possibly get in your way from fulfilling that feeling. If you have that absolute, deep, unwavering passion for what you’re doing, nothing and no-one will stop you from taking the necessary steps to achieve your goal!

3. Risk Taker

There’s an old saying that if you haven’t failed then you’re just not trying hard enough. Risk taking is a part of business. Thankfully it’s rarely life or death but it might be pretty scary financially or emotionally. When assessing risk, you have to decide if the potential benefits outweigh the cost, and then take the necessary action no matter how uncomfortable it it may feel.

4. Leadership

An entrepreneur is a leader. The two are not mutually exclusive. The definition of an entrepreneur is someone who starts and manages a business assuming the risk. You can’t start and manage a business without being a leader.

So ask yourself, are you ready to lead?

5. Flexibility

A lot of people mix up being flexible with being flighty. I’m not saying that you should just dabble in things or totally scrap a project at the first sign of trouble. You need to be focused and unshakeable on your big goals, but in parallel with that, you have to be able to be flexible with how things unfold day to day.

Being too rigid will cause you to lose a ton of opportunities that come up along the way, because you will be too focused on following your planned steps instead of recognizing opportunities that could get you to your end goal even better. So learn to pivot, and be flexible when you need to.

6. Perspective

Having a sense of perspective is absolutely critical, because working as an entrepreneur usually feels a little crazy and because you’re going to fail hideously at least once. If you get so wrapped up in what you’re doing that you can’t take a step back, see the humor in situations, or dispassionately look at your failures to see what you can learn from them, then this probably isn’t the path for you.

7. Self Belief

The challenge when starting and growing your business is that for most people it’s the other way round and your self doubt will be tinged with moments of self belief. In order to achieve success you’re going to have to tip the scales. There is no way past it. You have to do whatever it takes to increase your self belief.

Take more risks and move out of your comfort zone more often. With each small win your confidence will rise.

8. Commitment

Sometimes you are going to be faced with compelling opportunities which will detract you from your main focus and your ultimate goal. It’s down to you as an entrepreneur to stay committed to your ultimate goal and recognize which opportunities will move you closer to your goals and which will move you further away.

Beware the seduction of easy opportunity.

9. Resilience

Finally, you’ve absolutely got to be resilient, certainly in the face of failure, but also just in terms of daily life as an entrepreneur. It can be really hard when you’re working for yourself — people don’t really get what you do every day and sometimes they might even think you’re just ‘messing about’. Resilience is what keeps you going, both when you get hit with a big failure or just the everyday crisis, so it’s essential that you learn how to bounce back.

10. Speed

I know I’m surprising absolutely no one when I say that things move fast as an entrepreneur. To be a great entrepreneur, you’ve got to be able to work fast and still keep the quality of your output high.

That’s not to say that you can’t do great things if you like to think or act more slowly — but if you are like that, then you’ll probably need to get a partner or a group that will balance you out and force you to act. Otherwise you’ll likely stagnate.

Dennis Roeder
Contributor

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