Tag Archives: Cryptocurrency

This Marketing Strategy Is a Game Changer for Resource-Strapped Startups

This Marketing Strategy Is a Game Changer for Resource-Strapped Startups

Tech-powered ABM is the future of marketing.
Is your startup prepared for the transition?
 

Take a look around any city sidewalk, classroom, restaurant or waiting room,

and you’ll see how prevalent technology has become in our society. In fact, according to a 2018 survey by Pew Research Center, just more than a quarter of consumers say they're "constantly online." But technology could never eclipse real human conversations and interactions, could it?

According to Daryl Plummer, managing VP at Gartner, that reality is just a few years away. Plummer believes that by 2020, artificial intelligence tech (such as chatbots) will dominate both our social and business cultures, heading up everything from customer service interactions to lead discovery conversations. And because bots will be trained to deliver targeted messages, have personality and incorporate hyperlocal nuances into conversations, people could find great joy in engaging with them. Before we know it, we could all be conversing more with bots than with our own spouses.

We can thank today’s information-fatigued consumers for innovative solutions such as this — and, in part, for the growing popularity of account-based marketing. Rather than wasting time on mass marketing that fails to grab or keep targets' attention, ABM calls for marketers to tailor messages to specific personas or audiences — ultimately personalizing the brand experience for users and generating more viable leads for the company. And when paired with certain technology, ABM can be a real game changer for businesses, especially resource-strapped startups and time-starved entrepreneurs looking to tip the scales in their favor.

Making ABM work for your startup.

It's the scaled-back, prospect-focused approach of ABM that's key to effectively engaging your targets and maximizing your team’s efficiency. Each success you have with a targeted account will offer you new insights, skills and tools that will help you expand your marketing efforts as your startup grows. However, the true secret to ABM success is leveraging the right technologies to set your business apart from the others. The best emerging technologies will help you not only target and streamline your efforts, but also track and strengthen your engagement rates, saving you valuable time and money in the long run.

Some technologies are already known to pair well with ABM. For instance, digital footprints can aid in identifying your audience’s unique obstacles, and predictive intelligence solutions can help you anticipate target accounts' needs so you can perfectly time marketing messages. Furthermore, addressability and programmatic buying can enable you to target messaging to those with certain characteristics, such as job title. But it's important to investigate less-common technologies and automation systems, too, until you’ve customized a tech package that fits your company’s unique audience, focus, needs and budget. With your tech choices squared away, your next step is to incorporate them into your business plan. Here are some tips for making the conversion to ABM:

Don't be a one-trick pony.

Since 2013, Amazon has been the king of curating product recommendations. You can thank its ultrapersonalized home pages, in part, for teaching targets to ignore email blasts and banner ads that don’t speak directly to them. That’s why ABM emphasizes seizing their attention through personalized messages and customized brand experiences.

There are really no limits to how creative you can get personalizing your brand message or user experience. But you’ll typically find that the more effort you put into customizing your outreach, the more engagement you’ll get in return — a top benefit of ABM, according to 83 percent of marketers surveyed by Demandbase. You might start out by building personalized landing pages on your company’s website for specific clients and target audiences. Customize these pages with images, text and special offers that fit the audience’s unique preferences, interests and needs. Then, monitor whether these pages draw users back to your site and which features they interact with the most, and adjust your efforts accordingly.

Take a course in social intelligence.

What really sets ABM — and potentially your brand — apart is how you can make each account feel seen, heard, understood and appreciated. Doing so is vital to keeping your contacts satisfied. In fact, 84 percent of marketers told ITSMA that ABM has the highest return on investment of any marketing strategy or program, showing that ABM’s customer-driven approach is key for marketers in retaining and growing business relationships.

How do you learn all the nitty-gritty details about your contacts so you can craft messages that make a real impact? And how do you keep up with all the changes and challenges they experience over time? A great place to start is by subscribing to a public information service, such as Google Alerts, that allows you to customize search parameters, track company activity and receive alerts whenever changes occur. To unveil more minute distinctions, interests and challenges, monitor your target account's online social activity on sites such as LinkedIn and Twitter (try the list-building feature). Each new tidbit of information will help you anticipate your contacts' evolving needs, reshape your marketing messages and boost your startup’s value in their eyes.

Look beyond sales.

We all know that networking can be helpful in business. But when you’re working on a smaller scale, recognizing and capitalizing on business connections are frequently a pivotal part of building enduring relationships. It’s often that “we run with the same crowd, so let’s be friends” connection that pushes target accounts to choose your startup over your competitors. It’s important to remember that networking for your startup isn’t all up to sales, though. The rest of your team can make valuable connections that propel your business forward, too. In fact, a SiriusDecisions study found that when its clients cross-aligned their product, marketing and sales teams, they saw a 25 percent increase in revenue growth and a 56 percent increase in profitability.

The ideal way to uncover every valuable business connection your team may have is through the TeamLink feature on the LinkedIn Sales Navigator. With that information, you can then work your connections, get a dialogue going with potential customers and start building rapport that will hopefully lead to a sale. Technology isn’t going anywhere. It’s infiltrating our social and business lives more and more every day. But that doesn’t mean you need to adopt every form of new technology just to get your brand noticed. Instead, focus your efforts on account-based marketing solutions and technology. It’s the surest way to build meaningful connections, increase marketing efficiency, stay on budget and put your startup on the road to success.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Marketing.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

Establishing ethical guidelines for marketing cryptocurrencies

Establishing ethical guidelines for marketing cryptocurrencies

The marketing of cryptocurrencies and Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs)

is currently operating like the Wild West. From Ethereum to Litecoin to Neo, there are over 1,300 offerings in the burgeoning crypto market, and people like James Altucher are here to profit off the confusion. However, change is afoot. Facebook banned advertising of ICOs and cryptocurrencies, Google just joined suit and even Twitter is attempting to rein in the fraudsters. We need to establish what regulations must you follow to avoid liability and what ethical guidelines should the industry establish on its own to foster trust and legitimacy.

The Cryptocurrency Regulatory Landscape in Flux

So far, the U.S. is taking a cautionary approach to regulating cryptocurrencies and ICOs, issuing more statements than clear-cut regulations. This Coinbase article on ICO regulation summed up the government’s confusing approach well: “Be careful. ICOs are risky and dangerous. It’s possible that a token, depending on the circumstances, might not be a security, but it probably is. If the token resembles a security, again on a case-by-case basis, then you need to follow existing securities regulation for an ICO.” So, an ICO may be a security and governed by securities laws. Or maybe it isn’t. This lack of clarity poses risks for everyone from investors to entrepreneurs to marketers of running afoul of the law. Moreover, it poses questions of ethical duty: What rules should we follow? Should government put regulations in place?

There are many experts in the crypto industry that bemoan any mention of regulation, as the markets frequently react negatively to them. The anti-regulation sentiment is strong among Bitcoin investors, too. A recent survey by Lendedu showed that nearly 50% believe the government should not play a stronger role in regulating Bitcoin and virtual currencies in 2018. On the other hand, some experts say that the market is ready and even needs regulation to stabilize and gain the trust of mainstream investors. “I believe we need more regulation. It will hurt in the short term, but I believe it will eventually add a zero to the market cap,” said Protocol Ventures founder Rick Marini in an Q&A with VSC. “There’s a lot of big money—pension funds, endowments, institutional money—that is sitting on the sidelines, waiting for clarification.”Indiegogo Moves to Set a Standard and Self-Regulate

We should be looking to platforms like Indiegogo for inspiration on what a self-regulated crypto market should look like. Previously limited to the crowdfunding space, Indiegogo has chosen to follow all securities regulations in its initial foray into the crypto sphere in order to protect both sellers and investors and make the market more accessible to everyone.

Indiegogo partnered with FINRA-registered broker-dealer MicroVentures when it launched its equity crowdfunding portal last year to “help ensure [its] equity crowdfunding offerings are SEC compliant,” and it will similarly offer SEC-compliant ICOs. This is despite, as Indiegogo readily admits, the fact that many ICOs today are conducted outside of securities laws. For sellers, Indiegogo provides a registered broker-dealer that can facilitate token pre-sales inside current SEC regulations in addition to providing critical investor accreditation validation, know-your-customer (KYC), anti-money-laundering (AML) services. Additionally, it is not a free-for-all market—the company is carefully curating its selection of vetted token pre-sales to prevent shady ICOs from being offered on the platform.

Currency Ratings are Vital to Self-Regulation

The cryptocurrency industry should also consider creating independent cryptocurrency rating agencies a la S&Ps and Moody’s that rate bonds. While the 2008 market crash proved that these credit-based rating services are not perfect, that’s actually a good thing. The flaws in existing systems give the crypto industry a baseline for best practices and a way to learn from past mistakes. This could be accomplished via independent analyst teams that interview companies that are planning ICOs, and issue reports on the need for a coin in their stated use case, the financial strength of said company, management team pedigree, venture capital support, and then deliver A-F rating scale on the comfort with such an offering. In keeping with crypto’s purely market-based structure, non-governmental oversight seems more appropriate, especially if the market provides enough incentive for competing analyses.

It is possible that a truly crowdsourced rating prediction system could also be developed to supplement or even supplant the independent analysts. Studies have shown that non-expert “crowds” can be astonishingly effective at predicting outcomes. For example, UC Berkeley’s Good Judgement Project found that it can improve outcome predictions by training ordinary people to make more confident and accurate predictions over time as “superforecasters.” If applied with appropriate safeguards from manipulation, this crowd prediction model can also be applied to rating cryptocurrencies. Not only may it prove to be more accurate than ratings agencies, it’s very much in line with the decentralized nature of the cryptocurrency world.

I tend to believe clear and nationwide regulation of cryptocurrency will help stabilize the market and make it safer and more appealing to mainstream investors. But government regulation challenges the technical and cultural core of cryptocurrency as a decentralized market and a store of value that’s not tied to any one government-issued currency. Self-regulation of marketplaces and marketing could be the perfect middle ground. Effective self-regulation, exemplified at Indiegogo, can protect the future of the industry, the viability of cryptocurrencies, and even stem further government regulations. Of course, there is no guarantee this will stop regulation or even that users will want to adopt any rules. But the “good guys”—which is probably the majority of us—have a duty to act ethically and with the best of intentions when dealing with all types of investments, including the new frontier of cryptocurrencies. We can literally have the livelihoods of our friends and neighbors in our hands when doing this kind of work and we should all act accordingly.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Marketing.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

Cryptocurrency Airdrops: The What, the Why, and the How

Cryptocurrency Airdrops:
The What, the Why, and the How

As the blockchain industry and ecosystem develop,

new terms become commonplace amongst those who run in blockchain technology circles. In the cryptocurrency sphere, the word airdrop has taken on a different meaning from the more widespread military definition. In the blockchain world, the term airdrop refers to gifts.

What is an Airdrop?

Airdropping is the process of distributing tokens to a user’s blockchain wallet at no cost to them. It is a technique commonly used by startup businesses that are undertaking an Initial Coin Offering (ICO), as a tool to promote projects and increase their brand exposure. In addition to this, airdrops can happen when there is a fork in a cryptocurrency. Examples of this include Bitcoin users getting Bitcoin Cash, and Ethereum users getting Ethereum Classic tokens equal to the value of that held in their original wallets.

Why conduct an Airdrop?

Airdrops can happen for a number of reasons, the most common being:

To reward loyalty: Free tokens can be provided as a reward to users of cryptocurrency exchange websites, giving them free tokens to say thanks for being loyal to their platform. That was the case in 2017 when Binance gave 500 TRX to its users.

Marketing: Used by companies to attract attention during their ICOs in order to encourage investment in their crypto tokens. They are also often used at the launch of a new cryptocurrency, particularly when this is the result of a fork (for example, the Bitcoin Cash airdrop mentioned above).

Decentralization: This can help to create a higher level of security for the network and its users. For example, OmiseGO distributed a sizable chunk of its tokens to Ethereum users.

How do Airdrops happen?

One of two methods are generally used to conduct airdrops:

Planned: Planned airdrops are usually announced in advance, as part of a marketing strategy to promote a project and generate excitement in the crypto-community.
Surprise: Surprise can also generate excitement and a lot of free publicity when it is a well-established cryptocurrency that conducts the airdrop.

Where to find Airdrop information

Information relating to airdrops can be found in a number of sources, including:

  • Social media accounts/profiles
  • Crypto/blockchain forums
  • Crypto/blockchain news sites/applications

These sources can help users select the most popular or current airdrops. Besides this one, two other websites to source interesting and reliable information about airdrops are Airdropalert and Airdropaddict. Information about airdrops can also be sourced directly from the horse’s mouth, with companies that plan airdrops announcing them through social media and press releases. These releases generally contain the requirements on how to be eligible for the drop. An example of this can be seen in LCCX.

Security and scams

Like any other new technology, crypto and blockchain technology has attracted plenty of scammers in the recent past, and airdrops have not escaped this. It is, therefore, necessary to verify information about an airdrop, especially if you heard about it in an advertisement. You should never be asked for a private key, for your personal data, or for you to transfer funds.

Conclusion

Airdrops can be a useful technique to raise awareness of a new token or project – or to gain some coverage in the press with the excitement of free tokens for an established cryptocurrency. They have benefited the market greatly in building desire in users to invest in new projects, and to remain loyal to existing ones. But, like all technologies, it is vital to be on guard against scams and scammers, who will try to cheat you of your hard-earned cash and crypto.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Bitcoin.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

An In Depth Look Into Blockchain Technology

An In Depth Look Into Blockchain Technology

Blockchain, a brainchild of the of the mysterious pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto,

is an indisputably ingenious innovation. The technology allows digital information to be distributed to users without being copied, thus creating the spine of a new kind of internet. The Blockchain technology was originally invented for the sole purpose of governance of the digital currency, Bitcoin, however, tech pioneers have devised and continually devise other potential uses for arguably the most disruptive technology.

Bitcoin (BTC), tagged – quite appropriately the “digital gold”, currently has a total currency value of close to $9 billion (USD) with Blockchain technology being central to its development as well as other emerging altcoins. Similar to the internet, understanding how the Blockchain works is not a strict requirement for utilizing the technology. However, having a basic knowledge of the Blockchain technology would help you get a grasp of why the technology is revolutionary.

Distributed Database

Essentially, Blockchain works like a spreadsheet which is duplicated thousands of times across a network of nodes. This spreadsheet, by design, gets regularly updated with trade transactions.

This is essentially how the Blockchain functions i.e. information on a Blockchain exists as a shared database that is continually updated and reconciled. One of the amazing benefits of the Blockchain technology is the fact that this database of information and trade transactions is not stored in any single location and not governed by one central node or computer. Records kept on a Blockchain is indeed public and easily verifiable by anybody.

The fact that the Blockchain is not governed by any central node – instead, it is hosted by millions of nodes/computers concurrently over the internet – means it cannot be hacked.

Durable and Robust

Blockchain technology, similar to the internet, has a built-in robustness. The Blockchain stores blocks of records that are the exact same across its network and as such, this stored information cannot:

  • Be governed by a central authority &
  • Does not have any single point of failure

Since the invention of the first Blockchain based digital currency (Bitcoin) back in 2008 to this recent date, there has been no significant disintegration of the Bitcoin Blockchain (problems recorded with Bitcoin to date have been as a result of hacking or mismanagement). These issues are not attributed to the underlying concept of the Bitcoin Blockchain but to bad intentions (hacks) and human error. As with the case of the internet’s (which has been around for about thirty years) durability, the Blockchain technology is revolutionary and it is set to stay as it gets developed further.

Incorruptible and Transparent

The Blockchain technology network functions in a state of consensus whereby it automatically checks-in with itself on a ten-minute loop. Essentially, the Blockchain technology functions as a self-auditing ecosystem of digital assets’ value, it reconciles all transactions that occur in ten-minute intermissions. Each group of these reconciled transactions is called a “block”. As a result of the Blockchain automatically reconciling transactions, there are two resultants properties yr.

  • Transparency:
  • Transaction records are embedded within the Blockchain network as a whole and it is publicly accessible by every and anybody.
  • Incorruptible:
  • The Blockchain cannot be corrupted. To alter any unit of information on the Blockchain network, a huge amount of computing power is required to override the entire network.

While there is a possibility of this occurring theoretically, it is not practically feasible. Taking control of the Blockchain network to garner bitcoins would destroy the value of the digital currency itself.

A Network of Nodes

The Blockchain is made up of a network of computing nodes i.e. computers that are connected to the Blockchain network. These connected nodes (computers) use a client to perform transaction validating and relaying tasks, they automatically receive a copy of the Blockchain when they (nodes/computers) join the Blockchain network. Collectively, these nodes create a powerful second-level network. Each node that joins the Blockchain network is an “administrator” of the network and has an incentive for its participation as part of the Blockchain network i.e. ‘mining’ Bitcoin (in the case of the Bitcoin Blockchain).

‘Mining’ is sort of a misnomer, in actuality, it means each of the nodes competes to win Bitcoin (BTC) by cracking computational puzzles. While Bitcoin was the primary reason for the Blockchain technology invention, currently, there are over 800 altcoins available in the crypto sphere. Likewise, there have been other adaptations of the Blockchain technology concept with the Ethereum Blockchain especially being used as a working board for alternate Blockchain adaptations in industries ranging from finance, transportation, e-commerce etcetera.

Heightened Security

Blockchain technology offers an enhanced security for digital information via its storage of records across its network, thus eliminating the risks associated with records being held at a central location. Additionally, the Blockchain technology being decentralized translates as the network lacking a centralized point of vulnerability that can be exploited by hackers.

The Blockchain technology’s added security also comes from the use of encryption technology as its security methods, unlike the internet whereby users mostly rely on the ‘username-password’ system which opens up well-documented security issues. In the Bitcoin Blockchain, there exists the public and private “keys”. The public key which is a long, randomly-generated string of alphanumeric digits is the users’ address on the Blockchain. Users receive Bitcoin to this address (also called a wallet address).

The private key is a password (also a long, randomly-generated string of alphanumeric digits) acts as a personal user’s password for their wallet address. This private key is used to access your digital assets. While the Blockchain safeguards your digital assets (Bitcoin in this illustration), users are mandated to safeguard their private keys.

How Blockchain Technology Works

So, let’s break down how the Blockchain technology actually functions. When a new transaction occurs or an existing transaction is edited, these information enters into a Blockchain. This information is evaluated and verified by the nodes connected to the Blockchain via the execution of algorithms.

Since the Blockchain is consensus-based, a majority of connected nodes would need to come to a consensus about the validity of the history and signature of the transaction information after which the new block of transaction information is accepted into the Blockchain ledger and a new block is added to the transaction chain. Otherwise, the block of information is denied and not added to the chain. The distributed consensus model allows the Blockchain run as a distributed ledger without the need for a centralized governance.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Bitcoin.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

How Will Blockchain Affect Brands And Marketing?

How Will Blockchain Affect Brands And Marketing?

Whenever I advise on or architect blockchain solutions for a company,

someone always asks me, “How will a blockchain solution add brand value?”

The answer lies in the power of transparency.

People often talk about authenticity in a brand. It has become more and more important for shoppers to see that their favorite brands live out the same values that they do. And blockchain provides something that’s sorely lacking among brands at the moment—actual proof that sustainable, ethical, and responsible practices are being used in the production of goods. Millennials and other sustainable shoppers want that proof. If you look at the success of brands like Patagonia or Everlane—which are very transparent about where their materials come from and the conditions they’re produced under—it’s clear that the amount of people who want to buy ethical goods is growing.

Although many brands talk a big game, they don’t always walk the walk when it comes to labeling practices.

Brands have strong incentives to prove that their products are made in an ethical manner, without exploiting workers or destroying the environment. Brands know that Millennials and other socially-conscious shoppers want to buy products that are responsibly-sourced. So when you walk into a grocery store, there are labels and seals all over products that say “cruelty-free” or “sustainable” or “ethical.” They do it because that’s what sells. These labels have become so common that they don’t even merit a second look. The playing field has been leveled. And with Millennials spending an estimated $1.4 trillion per year by 2020, brands can’t take labeling lightly.

Some companies believe if you don’t have “organic” stamped on a product, then you’re not branding your product correctly.

But consumers want to know that product label claims are actually true. They want visibility into the chain of events that led to the stamp. For instance, palm oil is the most widely used vegetable oil on earth, with a projected 66 million tons being consumed in 2018. Yet the growth of plantations that produce the oil is destroying huge swaths of tropical forests, mostly due to “slash and burn” techniques used to clear land.

Blockchain provides an opportunity for brands to transparently record where their palm oil comes from. If they show it comes from sustainable sources, that in turn improves their brand value in the eyes of their customers. Companies that can actually prove their ethical practices will have a leg up on competitors who rely on stamps and marketing gimmicks.

Brand value isn’t just affected by where products come from—it’s also affected by where they go.

The fact is, the way we currently mass produce goods is inefficient. The supply is based off last year’s numbers, dubious projections, or whatever some new AI analysis can come up with. It’s rarely accurate.

What happens when it isn’t accurate? If projections come up short, companies lose out on potential profits. If they’ve overestimated the demand, the planet gets a brand new infusion of garbage. That’s not an exaggeration, either. Fast fashion outlets like Forever 21 and H&M have long been accused of burning or otherwise destroying surplus inventory. Blockchain can help suppliers shift from an oversaturated supply chain to a demand chain. We can move away from the concept of inventory to create a completely direct-to-consumer model, with goods produced based on the demands. No faulty projections or inventory destruction necessary.

Ideally, all participants in the demand chain will be interconnected by a common blockchain backbone.

This is not just good for the planet—it’s good for brands too. It means more operational efficiency and less money spent creating excess inventory. Companies can also tell their customers that they’re actively minimizing waste and not over-producing goods. Using blockchain, businesses can save money and become more efficient. Customers can feel good about buying their products. It’s a win-win. But it’s also important to remember the people who actually make these products. Customers may feel good about buying from a company that doesn’t destroy inventory, but that doesn’t mean the products themselves were produced ethically.

Blockchain can also enable decentralized, constant reporting and feedback systems for workers at every level of the supply chain.

Through tools like BetterKinds, companies can prove that the workers in their supply chain aren’t being exploited or working in run-down factories. And HR members can participate and align around the specific products and brands they’re helping to fulfill. We’ll see greater worker satisfaction, higher retention rates, and real changes in the way that our clothing, food, and technology is produced. The end game here is to create a circular economy—a closed-loop system where everyone in the demand chain is incentivizing each other to become more efficient, more sustainable, and more ethical. We have the technology we need in blockchain. We just have to put it to work.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Marketing.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

Major Differences Between Mobile And Desktop Marketing

 Major Differences Between
Mobile And Desktop Marketing

Around the globe, mobile is taking over. While there is no denying that mobile is where you need to be targeting your customer base, is that true for all industries and audiences? What about workers that sit at a desktop computer or laptop all day? Reaching these consumers takes finesse, and you need to plan your marketing strategy accordingly. That's why a dual campaign is important to reach your business’s promotional goals.

Communications executives outline the major differences between
mobile and desktop marketing.

Amount Of Content

What works as the right amount of content on a desktop may not be the right amount on a mobile device. On mobile, you shouldn't have more content than you can reasonably expect a visitor to scroll through and consume. Make it simpler for them to understand exactly why they should scroll because you're working with a lot less real estate than on a desktop to get that point across.

Priorities

On a desktop screen, it's possible to fit several calls to action. Add this to your cart, sign up for our newsletter, here's five ads, etc. A mobile device should only showcase one actionable item at a time. Order each CTA vertically in order of importance to your business. Attempting to fit two or more side by side will be too busy for users and dilute their effectiveness. Less is more.

Image Format 

An issue many brands have when maintaining a cross-platform strategy is posting images in formats that do not match best practices for their destination. Images cropped to a portrait-aspect ratio tend to have better performance on mobile, while landscape-aspect ratios tend to perform better on desktops. Optimizing for the target destination is often overlooked, but can have a sizable effect on ROI.

Location

As is true in real estate, location is important when it comes to developing mobile- or online-first campaigns. Consider where people are engaging with your campaigns. If they're interacting with your campaign during their commute, in between meetings or from their couch, are you meeting their expectations for the amount of effort they have to put in?

Content Fitting With User Habits 

Most mobile usage is done on the go, while standing in line, waiting for a movie to begin or an order to arrive, etc. You have a very limited window. Content should be short and engaging with easy-to-follow calls to action. Remove as many potential obstacles as you can. Make content easy to share, pre-populate contact information and make purchasing something simple with as few steps as possible.

How People Use Their Devices

Marketers need to decide between mobile and desktop based on the differences in use. For example, we have our smartphones with us 24/7, but we rarely run deep online research on them. My advice would be to combine mobile and desktop: Mobile can be used as an alert or interesting hook to an offer, while the discovery phase should be mobile optimized, but better fit the desktop.

User Intent

The key is recognizing that there is a distinction when it comes to intent between devices. A consumer searching for your product on their mobile device likely has a different intent than when they are at their desktop. Your copy needs to address both the audience and intent, which will differ by device. Use data to drive your investment once you have segmented your reporting.

Fewer Words, More Visuals

The rule "fewer words, more visuals" is not a surprise when we speak about desktop marketing, but it's a must in mobile marketing. Ads should be as short and eye-catching as possible. Use visuals that speak to pain points and solutions, and provide call-to-action (CTA) buttons.

Facebook Video Ads 

If you're marketing through a Facebook video ad, keep in mind that most people look at Facebook on their phones. They may be checking it under the table in a meeting when they're bored. For that reason, their volume will be turned off. Therefore, your video must be compelling and easy to understand without sound. Facebook will allow you to add captions to your video if needed.

Attribution 

People don't complete the main goal (purchase/lead) of a website on a mobile device. Rather, they do it on a desktop and use their mobile device as a research tool throughout the buying journey. If a marketer were to only measure the last touch as a success metric, they would have trouble finding mobile ROI. You need to attribute all steps of the journey to the final sale.

Altering States Of User Experience

When creating content and selecting platforms to expand reach, it's important to keep UX design top of mind as it will affect the way your consumers interact with your content. Just as code appears differently on mobile and desktop, marketing assets and content are experienced differently on both. Marketers that focus on creating excellent UX/UI design will see the most ROI from their campaigns.

Multi-Screen Opportunities

Although there has been a boom in consumer mobile purchases, desktop marketing isn’t dead. While mobile marketing should capture attention quickly and be shareable, there’s a unique opportunity for marketers to thoroughly flesh out messages on desktops. Plus, most consumers use more than one screen so you can capture them with a cohesive message across all channels — mobile or desktop.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Marketing.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

The Night $1 Million in Crypto Began Raining From the Sky

The Night $1 Million in Crypto Began Raining From the Sky

Free cryptocurrency tokens fell from balloons in Mainframe's first "airdrop"
in Hong Kong on March 20, 2018. It was part of a giveaway in which the secure messaging company will release a total $1 million worth of crypto coins. The crowd, most of them wearing masks, squinted up at the raft of multicolored balloons floating near the ceiling, trying to make out the silhouettes of the coins suspended inside each one. And then, against the backdrop of Hong Kong’s neon-rainbow skyline, they raised their hands as the countdown began: “10, 9, 8…FREEDOM!” they screamed, amid a shower of confetti. Suddenly, the loud popping of a fireworks show filled the room as the balloons exploded, and the crypto tokens they contained fell into eager hands.

The spectacle Tuesday evening, held at the inaugural Token 2049 conference, released tens of thousands of dollars’ worth of free digital money. But it was just the first of 25 events in which a Utah-based secure messaging startup called Mainframe will give away about $1 million of its cryptocurrency—by literally making it rain crypto coins upon the heads of enthusiasts.

It’s also an example of the creative lengths to which blockchain companies are going in order to stay in-bounds of a threatened crackdown by the U.S. Securities or Exchange Commission on initial coin offerings, or ICOs. The SEC has said ICOs—in which companies sell digital tokens in order to raise startup capital—could constitute an illegal sale of securities. But Mainframe and others have found a way to dodge that dreaded label: Just give the crypto away for free.

Enter the so-called “airdrop,” in which companies bestow a sprinkling of their crypto coins upon select supporters via the Internet. Now, Mainframe is pioneering a version of that concept in the real-life, physical world. “We are taking it literally,” Mick Hagen, Mainframe’s CEO and founder, told Fortune just moments before the tokens splashed down like it was Times Square on New Year’s Eve. “We thought, what if we do a real airdrop?”

It’s believed to be the first time anyone has introduced a brand new cryptocurrency via physical distribution (though in actuality, Mainframe’s tokens were to be exchanged for codes, which could then be redeemed online for virtual “MFT” coins). Mainframe initially sold its tokens in a private pre-sale exclusively for accredited investors (several of whom witnessed the airdrop), raising 27,000 of Ethereum cryptocurrency that’s currently worth some $15 million.

The capital will fund Mainframe’s development

of a messaging service that is not only encrypted, but masks the trajectory of messages using “dark routing,” in order to be “censorship-resistant and surveillance-resistant.” Such technology, the company argues, will better preserve users’ freedom.

But while Mainframe had originally considered holding an ICO,

it felt it unwise “given the regulatory environment.” SEC chairman Jay Clayton said in November that he had “yet to see an ICO that doesn’t have a sufficient number of hallmarks of a security,” and testified in a Senate hearing last month that he believed ICOs were in violation of the law. In a separate hearing on ICOs in Congress last week, Mike Lempres, chief legal and risk officer for cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase, said the company does not trade ICO tokens because it “cannot take the risk of inadvertently trading an asset that is later found to be a security.”

It’s unclear if Mainframe’s literal “air drop”

would pass legal muster in the United States, or if regulators in other countries will agree the gimmick does not violate securities laws. Whereas the SEC has mostly been concerned with protecting investors from financial harm, Mainframe also wanted to make sure its token recipients would be safe from physical injury. “There were a lot of different logistics to work through. We don’t want anyone to get hurt,” added Hagen, who describes himself as a Princeton drop-out and Mormon on his Twitter profile. After all, the tokens, roughly the same size and weight as poker chips (and valued at 0.1 Ether, or about $56 apiece), could be dangerous if dropped from high.

So Mainframe opted to insulate the tokens with inflatables.

“When the balloons fall it shouldn’t hurt because of the balloon,” Hagen said. “We want people to walk away thinking, this was a fun airdrop.” The display conjured visuals of the economic idea, advocated by former Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke, of “helicopter money.” A metaphorical term for how a central bank could stimulate the economy by creating money from thin air, Bernanke wasn’t literally suggesting dropping it from a helicopter.

Mainframe, however, did consider that possibility.

“We were thinking drones, but if [the token] hits somebody’s head, it might hurt,” Hagen said. For those who missed the first-ever live airdrop, Mainframe will bring the show to four more cities in the next two weeks—Shanghai, Beijing, Seoul, and Tokyo—with more to follow. The company is calling this method of distribution “proof of being,” a play on Bitcoin’s method of verifying transactions, known as proof of work.

There are also two other ways to scoop up the free tokens if you can’t attend in person: “Proof of freedom,” which Hagen said could be some form of expression about Mainframe such as an essay, video or blog; and “proof of heart,” which the company is not yet willing to explain in detail. But Hagen is envisioning it as an antidote to the “get rich quick” mindset that has pervaded the crypto world, a way to ensure Mainframe token holders aren’t just in it for the money. After all, the airdrops strictly limit attendees to leaving with just a single token. “We wanted to have methods to make sure we have true believers in technology, and true believers in Mainframe,” Hagen said.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Bitcoin.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

All you need to know about Crypto Airdrops. AKA Free Money.

All you need to know about Crypto Airdrops. AKA Free Money.

Plus- A few Airdrops I look forward to.

They say that there’s nothing in the world such as a free lunch.
The Simpsons called it first.

I find the word Free to be the most ironic word in the history of spoken languages. Everything ever offered to you free of cost usually comes with an attached T&C, or is contingent on an item you purchase prior to it, or is of subs-standard quality, or is a 100 different reasons which I choose not to list.

Hence, I usually run the other direction when someone pitches a “Free of cost” product to me. However, the world of Crypto gives zero shits about the rules and standardized systems of the normal, traditional world. Remember James Bond ? The type of man who follows his own rules, has a self-affirmed code of conduct, an own set of ethics, and who can piss in your drink before walking away with your girl at your Local bar night.

Crypto is the James Bond of the Finance world.

My terrible Photoshop.

Crypto follows no rules, regulations, or constructs of the typical market. It has it’s own mind, own systems, own set of ethics, and own ecosystem. And guess what, in the world of Crypto, you absolutely CAN get a free lunch or a coffee or a Toy Lambo by just registering for Airdrops.

“You gotta to be kiddin’ me.”

A while ago Token Start ups realized that there is a lot more value when their token is held on as many wallets as possible. More coins lead to more interest and exposure, which in turn greatly increases the Trading Volume of a particular coin when it gets listed on an exchange. Then came up with an indigenous solution – Airdrop. And no, I am not referring to the software update here. Participating in an Airdrop is simple. You discover, or are informed of an Airdrop, fill out a telegram form, give your Ethereum (or relevant coin) wallet address, and Voila ! Free Tokens in your wallet a few weeks from then.

What is it also does is create marketing waves in the crypto ecosystem. People start discovering and talking about “free” tokens, and the word spreads around the community about that particular Token. The word reaches thousands of people, and the cost of advertising – zero. Compared to an ICO, which initially involves a Private Sale (basically the rich getting richer), followed by a Public sale, where small time investors purchase tokens for ETH or BTC. An Airdrop takes away the payment bit of this process, instead giving more value towards informing people of their offering, and giving every one the chance to own

some tokens.

In an airdrop (or hard fork), tokens are allocated to existing holders of a particular chain — typically Bitcoin or Ethereum. That’s right, instead of buying tokens, they’re simply given away to the holders of another coin.

AIRDROP 101

Let’s dig in to understand the viability of this approach and, most importantly, its implications for Bitcoin and Ether holders. You’re probably thinking – Why would a project distribute its tokens for free instead of selling them? In many ways, the airdrop (or hard fork) method of distributing tokens is a better way to accomplish the same objectives of an ICO, which are usually three-fold:

  1. Raise Popularity: Getting your token to as many wallets and people as possible for building a strong base of active users, who just might end up being real customers. Breadth of distribution is typically the important metric, particularly given that many projects are trying to jump-start a network effect.
  2. Raise awareness: A lot of monetary interest is built once the token hits exchanges.
  3. Raise capital: To fund the future development and build-out of the project.

Advantages of an airdrop or hard-fork

Breadth of Distribution

The earlier option involved an ICO, or an Initial Coin Offering, through which participants use BTC or ETH to buy tokens. However, the tokens ended up in the hands of a narrow demographic, usually just 30 or 40 thousand odd people. While there’s certainly a lot of money involved right here, there is very less of an awareness.

For a quick retrospect, Bitcoin and Ethereum have millions of users. An airdrop effectively puts your token in the hands of millions. Even if only 1% of users actually engage your project, you’ve likely achieved significantly broader distribution and more engagement than even the most successful token sales.

Awareness

One of the ancillary but important benefits of token sales is that they help raise awareness for your project. At any given time, there’s a handful of ICO’s and coin hopefuls screaming for your attention. The ecosystem just isn’t designed to handle this, and in the end, only a couple projects, at the most, end up with the exposure they require. However, your target community might be more likely to take a serious look at your project if they’ve been given a stake — rather than the burden of making a purchase decision.

A very subtle, yet important difference. People are in a different position when they’ve been given a stake and must decide what to do with it (Sell? Hold? Buy more?). At the very least, this will typically encourage some portion of the community to educate itself about your project. In this sense, giving away tokens in an airdrop or hard-fork is similar to a guerilla marketing campaign.

Fund Raising

While a handful of the highest-profile ICOs ultimately raised hundreds of millions of dollars, most raise a tiny fraction of

those amounts.

Unfortunately like traditional news, you end up listening to only the successes and never the failures.

Again, airdrops can be (and have been) at least as successful in this regard. There’s many potential approaches that a project could take here. A simple example would be to airdrop 95% of tokens to all holders of Bitcoin (or Ethereum) while the project itself and the team behind it reserves 5% of tokens to fund future development.

Regulatory Risk

Perhaps the most important point of them all. A lot of regulator run-ins occurs when there is cold, hard cash involved. The governments have shown us time and again, they are VERY interested and suddenly affected when a product is sold and revenues and being made and capital is being generated. Eliminating this risk is simple – conduct an Airdrop, hehe. An airdrop could be the path of least resistance (and maximum effect), considering all the above noted points.

Two Airdrops I am looking at –

As a full time crypto-trader, I keep my eyes and ears wide open for any new airdrops, ICOs, or news that adds onto, or affects my portfolio. So obviously, I aim to invest in the best tech I can find, and increase my holdings. (P.S No affiliate links ahead. I don’t make a dime out of anything here.)

Callisto

An Ethereum Classic Hard Fork, Callisto is a blockchain technology which runs on the Ethereum Classic protocol. Callisto introduces a cold staking protocol which rewards token holders for being participants. Cold staking is a way of giving CLO token holders incentives for holding for a specific period of time, allowing them to earn interests without validating transactions as transactions will be achieved by the Proof-of-Work algorithm.

The Callisto Network announced in recent as seen here that Callisco will launch soon. At launch, accounts that had Ethereum Classic balances at block 5500000 will receive an equivalent amount of Callisto tokens in the ration of 1:1. Meaning ETC token holders will get 1 Callisto (CLO) token for Every Ethereum Classic (ETH) held. In fact, the guys over at Crypto Disrupt have a wonderfully written guide about Callisto, and I would highly recommend you to go through that.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Bitcoin.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

 

Google Is Working on Its Own Blockchain-Related Technology

Google Is Working on Its Own Blockchain-Related Technology

  • Alphabet division developing a distributed digital ledger
  • Company insiders say cloud is natural home for the technology

What’s Coming in the Year Ahead

Google is working on blockchain-related technology to support its cloud business and head off competition from emerging startups that use the heavily-hyped technology to operate online in new ways, according to people familiar with the situation. Companies use blockchain and other so-called digital ledgers to securely record transactions and process other data over the internet — a service Google could use, for example, to reassure customers that their information is protected when stored on the giant network of computer servers that power its cloud services.

The Alphabet Inc. unit is developing its own distributed digital ledger that third parties can use to post and verify transactions, one of the people said. Although the timing of any product release is unclear, the company plans to offer this to differentiate its cloud service from rivals. It will also provide a white-label version that other companies can run on their own servers, the person added. The internet giant has also been acquiring and investing in startups with digital ledger expertise. Many of the deals haven’t been announced, the person said. Still, Alphabet was a leading corporate investor in the field last year, ahead of Citigroup Inc. and Goldman Sachs Group Inc., according to research firm CB Insights.

Several people in Google’s infrastructure group, which reports to cloud chief Diane Greene, have been tinkering with blockchain protocols in recent months, according to another person familiar with the company. Other Google insiders said recently that the cloud business is a natural place for blockchain-related services. The people asked not to be identified talking about the subject because the company isn’t ready to make an announcement yet. “Like many new technologies, we have individuals in various teams exploring potential uses of blockchain but it’s way too early for us to speculate about any possible uses or plans,” a Google spokesman said.

In 2016, Google started a trial for developers testing blockchain services on its cloud. The company is now exploring much more expansive ways to deploy the technology, the people said. Digital ledgers like blockchain power Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. They are databases that are updated regularly across thousands of computers over the internet. Each entry is confirmed by these machines, which can be part of public networks or run privately by companies. There are different kinds of digital ledgers — blockchain is only one. Data crunched by this technology range from transactions to supply-chain updates to digital cats.

The technology presents challenges and opportunities for Google. Distributed networks of computers that run digital ledgers can eliminate risks that come with information held centrally by a single company. While Google’s security is strong, it’s one of the largest holders of information in the world. The decentralized approach is also beginning to support new online services that compete with Google.

Still, the company is an internet pioneer and has long experience embracing new and open web standards. To build its ledger, Google has looked at technology from the Hyperledger consortium, but it could opt for another type that may be easier to scale to run millions of transactions, one of the people familiar with the situation said.

"Any time there’s a paradigm shift like this, there’s an opportunity for new giants to emerge — but also for incumbents to adopt the new approach," said Elad Gil, a startup investor who worked on early mobile projects at Google more than a decade ago. Sridhar Ramaswamy, Google’s advertising chief, said at a recent conference that his division has a "small team" looking at blockchain, but noted the existing core technology can’t handle a lot of transactions quickly. Some marketing firms have started to explore blockchain’s potential to facilitate digital ad buying without using Google and Facebook Inc., the two dominant industry players.

When Alphabet wants to keep up with emerging technology, it often backs startups in the field and makes small acquisitions to recruit talent. GV, Alphabet’s venture capital arm, has invested in wallet service Blockchain Luxembourg, financial transactions network Ripple, cryptocurrency asset management platform LedgerX, international payments provider Veem and the now-defunct Buttercoin, according to CB Insights.

Among tech giants, IBM and Microsoft Corp. have so far led the charge in offering blockchain-related tools and letting companies tinker with digital ledgers using their cloud services. The market for blockchain products and services may grow from $706 million last year to more than $60 billion in 2024, according to WinterGreen Research. Cloud’s 800-pound gorilla, Amazon.com Inc., helps companies build blockchain applications, and Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg is looking at cryptocurrencies, encryption and other decentralized computing approaches.

A slew of startups are trying to challenge Google’s online dominance by using digital ledgers. Brave is a web browser that competes with Google’s Chrome. Instead of running targeted ads, Brave uses blockchain technology to pay websites when people spend time there. BitClave lets people perform searches online, and get rewarded for seeing ads. Another project, Presearch, is also using blockchain to try to compete with Google’s search engine, according to a white paper by the startup. "You’re going to see an unbelievable amount of R&D expenditures go into this," said Jeff Richards, a managing partner at venture firm GGV Capital. "Everybody learned from the internet and mobile that you can’t afford to wait."

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Bitcoin.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

How Do The CMOs Of PayPal, HireVue, Ogilvy And Comedy Central Structure Their Marketing Teams?

How Do The CMOs Of PayPal, HireVue, Ogilvy And Comedy Central Structure Their Marketing Teams?

Department structure all depends on the needs of the organization,
 
company culture, and the strategy the team is using to reach its customers. It’s actually one of the most difficult decisions CMOs will make—how to structure their department. You can’t pilot a new structure or test it. And few CMOs have a lot of experience in restructuring departments making it an even greater challenge. To better understand how different firms structure their marketing organizations, I turned to Josh Steimle, CEO of digital marketing agency MWI. Through in-depth interviews, Steimle learned how the chief marketers of PayPal, HireVue, Ogilvy & Mather and Comedy Central structure their marketing teams. Below are thoughts from Steimle and quotes from his book, Chief Marketing Officers at Work.

Kimberly Whitler:

How does PayPal organize marketing?

Josh Steimle:

At PayPal, the marketing team is split into consumer, digital and traditional as the team is fairly consumer focused and also allocates quite a bit of resources on digital. “There’s a team that focuses on consumer strategy around the seasonal, quarterly, and annual consumer marketing planning. There’s a focus on consumer segments, one of which is new customer journey. Another, for example, would be around the youth market or highly engaged customers,” said Patrick Adams, Head of Consumer Marketing.

“The next team is a pure digital team that focuses on a best-in- class digital acquisition discipline [display affiliates, SEO, SEM], and digital experience optimization. There is a priority to optimize all of our digital properties, whether it be the dot-com, the mobile site, or the app. True end-to- end optimization.” Besides consumer strategy and digital, Adams said that his marketing department is home to a third team that handles more of the traditional side of things. “The last team is a traditional marketing services team that is responsible for marketing ops, project management, database management, creative, and QA that services all of North America,” he said.

Whitler:

Is the structure different at a smaller firm—HireVue?

Steimle:

At HireVue, marketing team structure is dictated by its core functions. Former HireVue CMO, Kevin Marasco (currently CMO of Zenefits) said that his marketing team structure is dependent on the company’s strategic focus. “Our core functions are demand marketing, solid content, digital, and web. We have a field and corporate marketing team that does events, promotions and creative services. The product marketing team does all the product marketing, a bit of intelligence, etcetera. Then, we have a go-to- market team, which takes everything and is responsible for the field enablement of our sales team, services team,” he said.

In addition to their PR and communications team, Marasco said that they’re also focusing efforts on a newly-minted team that handles customer advocacy. “That’s a huge, newer area of marketing that we’re focused on—once we land an account, continuing to drive advocacy, expansion, renewals, referrals, and things like that. We also have a social marketing function, which is another newer area, relatively speaking, for marketers. You used to see social placed in corporate comms, digital, demand, or even HR.” he said. “We now have a broader focus on social. We’re trying to integrate it into all aspects of the business—social selling, social marketing, services and support.”

Whitler:

How does a behemoth like Ogilvy organize its marketing function?

Steimle:

Ogilvy has a director of content that handles all specialized functions. At Ogilvy & Mather, Senior Partner and Global CMO Lauren Crampsie has a right hand man that handles all things content. “Right now, there’s the centralized global structure, which has a managing director of content, Nikolaj Birjukow. That’s a new position I built particularly for him about two years ago. Nikolaj is my number two on the marketing side and he oversees all of the specialized functions within marketing,” she said.

What Birjukow does is oversee all of Ogilvy’s social media and community management, which also includes the company’s web developers, UX designers and all editorial staff. “Nikolaj also oversees our internal communication staff—the staff that oversees our internal Internet—and how we communicate with our employees. My MD oversees that staff as well. It’s a real content marketing-driven team. I have a worldwide editorial director, Jeremy Katz. I think Ogilvy was the first agency ever to do a content partnership with a publication. We did one with Fast Company about two years ago,” she said. This is because Crampsie is a big believer in content marketing and brands as publishers and so she structures the marketing team (editorial team included) around that philosophy.

As Ogilvy operates hundreds of offices around the world, Crampsie said that of course local marketing teams are structured according to who is running it. PR however is decentralized at the local level. “The only central PR function is me, so I personally take on any big global announcements, crisis management, or anything of that nature because I think it’s the most effective way. In many cases—especially with social media and the Internet, where it’s so hard to control anything—having somebody of my seniority and my tenure take that on personally is the quickest way to get results at the global level,” she said.

Whitler:

Lastly, how does Comedy Central organize their marketing activities?

Steimle:

Comedy Central does all their creative work and advertising in-house. At Comedy Central, Former Executive Vice President and CMO Walter Levitt (currently President of CMOish) shares that most resources are allocated towards their creative team as they do all of their creative work and advertising fully in-house. “In our creative team, we have a large team of writer-producers. We have a large team of designers and a large team of copywriters. They are working every day to do the best work from an editorial and design point of view for the brand. They are working to create all the advertising, all the campaigns around our content,” he said.

In addition, Levitt said that Comedy Central also employs a brand marketing team that’s responsible for overall marketing strategy, media planning and buying. “We are big buyers of other people’s media, and that brand marketing team is responsible for all that media planning and buying. Tucked in there is our social media marketing, which is handled by some combination of all the groups,” he said.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Marketing.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614